From Prague to Putin: An Analysis of Czech-Russian Relations and their Echoes in Eastern Europe

by ANNA STONEMAN, University of Chicago '21 The democratization of the Czech Republic has long been predictive of the political and ideological leanings of Eastern Europe. For a brief period during the heart of the Cold War and the decades following, the nation became widely perceived as bastion of the West, and the ideology it ...

CJFP’s Spring 2018 Print Edition!

Our Spring 2018 print edition can be accessed in full on Issuu at this link, around campus in the coming weeks, and at Bartlett Lounge this coming Thursday, May 24th, at 8:00 PM. Thanks to our editors Nicole, Davis, and Gaurav, our design editor, Max, and to our contributors from UChicago and around the country for ...

Quad 2.0: Malabar 2018 and Beyond

by PALLAVI GEETHIKA, University of Chicago '21 This April, the Australian Defence Ministry confirmed that Australia will not join India, Japan, and the United States in the upcoming Malabar naval exercises scheduled to take place near Guam.[1] Collectively called ‘Exercise Malabar’, these drills began in 1992 as annual bilateral naval exercises between India and the ...

The Case for Unconditional Aid: Why the IMF and World Bank Should be Structurally Adjusted

by BEN SILVIAN, University of Chicago '20 The two largest global financial institutions, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, impose strong conditions on their loans, and they have since their inception. This system, known as the Washington Consensus (WC), has long required that a country go through “structural adjustment” in order to receive ...

New Approaches to America’s Longest War

by BEN SILVIAN Even though the Islamic State has lost much of its territorial holdings in Iraq and Syria, it would be a mistake to assume that security in the Middle East is no longer a serious concern. In fact, recent headlines highlighting America’s successes against terrorism in the Middle East may promote complacency and ...

Russia v. Russia: The Ex-Soviet Fighters in Iraq and Syria

by JOSH ZAKHAROV Last September, Russia claimed to have killed the Islamic State’s Minister of War with a bunker-buster airstrike in Deir ez-Zor, Syria. This kind of leadership decapitation is a common strategy in counterinsurgency – the logic that targeting leaders can disorganize and weaken insurgent groups is sound on face, and is in no ...

China in Global Politics: The Coming of a New Era

by VALERIE KELUN ZHU Currently, China has been collaborating with a great number of developing countries, offering loans four times as much as the World Bank offers to its partners. While China has now undeniably become one of the most crucial players in international politics, its diplomatic moves are still occasionally puzzling. Against this backdrop, one ...

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