India’s Push for Privacy

by BEN SILVIAN, '20 In March, the Indian government’s relatively new ID database, Aadhaar, suffered a major data breach.1 Aadhaar stores a plethora of identity and biometric data on 1.1 billion of India’s just over 1.3 billion citizens, including their fingerprints and iris scans, making this breach a major concern.2 The data is accessible with ...

What Putin’s Offer at Helsinki Should Tell Congressional Leaders

by JOSH ZAKHAROV, '20 To put it mildly, the Helsinki Summit was a poor public relations move for the President. President Trump’s take on the finding of seven intelligence agencies that Russia conclusively waged an influence campaign in the 2016 election was, to say the least, not quite what Congressional leaders or his Director of ...

Dubious Decapitation: How Mullah Fazlullah’s Death Will Affect the Pakistani Taliban

by BEN SILVIAN, '20 At first glance, the U.S. military’s successful drone strike against Mullah Fazlullah, the head of the Pakistani Taliban (TTP), on June 13 is a major success. Fazlullah, who had lead the militant group since 2013, was known to be a “particularly ruthless militant.”[i] He was responsible for ordering the 2012 attack ...

In Defense of Development – A Response to “The Case for Unconditional Aid”

The following piece is a response to a recent blog post by staff contributor Ben Silvian. by JAKOB URDA, '19, and ZACHARY LEMONIDES, '19 In his recent piece, ‘The Case for Unconditional Aid,’ Ben Silvian claims that “the problem is that structural adjustment programs are unequivocally bad”— but history rarely speaks in such absolutes. The ...

Untangling a Diplomatic History – An Analysis of American Interventionist Policy in Iran from 1951-1954

by KATIE GARCIA, Columbia University '20 The nationalization of Iranian oil and the subsequent emergence of nationalist leader Mohammad Mossadegh as prime minister signify a watershed moment in the history of diplomatic relations between the United States and Iran.  Domestically, Mossadegh represented constitutionalism, resource autonomy, and popular nationalism.  In the eyes of United States officials, ...

The Last Hundred Days

by SARAH MANNEY, Stanford University '18 At the end of the French Revolution of 1789, historian R. R. Palmer wrote that “The wars of the kings were over; the wars of the people had begun.”[1] Today, this maxim threatens to be reversed. Although increasing Chinese and Russian assertiveness towards the West leads many to question ...

Freezing Hot: Escalating Tensions in the Arctic

by SARAH McKELLAR, American University '19 The Council on Foreign Relations Independent Task Force Report, Arctic Imperatives: Reinforcing U.S. Strategy on America's Fourth Coast, stated, "The United States, through Alaska, is a significant Arctic nation with strategic, economic, and scientific interests.”[1] For a significant amount of time, the U.S. government has put the Arctic region ...

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