Category: Uncategorized

The Wrong Peak, Part 2: Technological Change

by JACK HAYNIE, '20 The oil industry, like any other sector of the economy, is eternally at the mercy of technological change. Increasingly, petroleum has been pressured by changes to industries where it once was the unquestioned energy source of choice. Even where it is still used, innovations in fuel efficiency have drastically reduced the ...

A Year after Santos’ Nobel Peace Prize, Why is Colombia Not at Peace?

by JOSH ZAKHAROV, '20 In August 2016, Juan Manuel Santos, then President of Colombia, and Timoleon “Timochenko” Jimenez, then leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), shook hands in Havana to seal an agreement that would end a civil conflict that had wreaked hundreds of thousands of casualties, displaced millions, and lasted decades. ...

The U.S. should let the IMF should bail out Pakistan. Here’s why.

by JOSH ZAKHAROV, '20 Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced in an interview with CNBC that the United States would oppose a hypothetical International Monetary Fund bailout of Pakistan’s $12 billion debt to China. “We will be watching what the IMF does,” said Pompeo, as "there's no rationale for IMF tax dollars — ...

India’s Push for Privacy

by BEN SILVIAN, '20 In March, the Indian government’s relatively new ID database, Aadhaar, suffered a major data breach.1 Aadhaar stores a plethora of identity and biometric data on 1.1 billion of India’s just over 1.3 billion citizens, including their fingerprints and iris scans, making this breach a major concern.2 The data is accessible with ...

What Putin’s Offer at Helsinki Should Tell Congressional Leaders

by JOSH ZAKHAROV, '20 To put it mildly, the Helsinki Summit was a poor public relations move for the President. President Trump’s take on the finding of seven intelligence agencies that Russia conclusively waged an influence campaign in the 2016 election was, to say the least, not quite what Congressional leaders or his Director of ...

In Defense of Development – A Response to “The Case for Unconditional Aid”

The following piece is a response to a recent blog post by staff contributor Ben Silvian. by JAKOB URDA, '19, and ZACHARY LEMONIDES, '19 In his recent piece, ‘The Case for Unconditional Aid,’ Ben Silvian claims that “the problem is that structural adjustment programs are unequivocally bad”— but history rarely speaks in such absolutes. The ...

Untangling a Diplomatic History – An Analysis of American Interventionist Policy in Iran from 1951-1954

by KATIE GARCIA, Columbia University '20 The nationalization of Iranian oil and the subsequent emergence of nationalist leader Mohammad Mossadegh as prime minister signify a watershed moment in the history of diplomatic relations between the United States and Iran.  Domestically, Mossadegh represented constitutionalism, resource autonomy, and popular nationalism.  In the eyes of United States officials, ...