Category: Uncategorized

D

Democratic Transition & Authoritarian Exceptionalism

This article uses the case of Egypt, during and after the Arab Spring, to highlight the shortcomings of the popular transition paradigm and challenge theorists who contend that Islam is to blame for the widespread authoritarianism in the region.

CJFP’s Winter 2020 Edition

Our Spring 2019 edition can be viewed on Issuu at this link and downloaded in the “Journals” tab of our site. Thanks to our staff here at UChicago and our contributors from UChicago and around the country for making this possible.

CJFP’s Spring Quarter 2019 Edition

Our Spring 2019 edition can be viewed on Issuu at this link and downloaded in the “Journals” tab of our site. Thanks to our staff here at UChicago and our contributors from UChicago and around the country for making this possible.

Who Decides when Britain Goes to War? The War Prerogative in the United Kingdom

by GWYNETH HOCHHAUSLER, '20 Traditionally, the British Parliament holds far fewer foreign policy powers than the Prime Minister does.[1] One of the most important of these powers, which the executive has controlled for hundreds of years, is the war prerogative – the power “to declare war and deploy the armed forces”.[2]  Some academics have asserted ...

Slaughter Strategy: On Genocide’s Calculated Origins

by DAVIS LARKIN, '19 One of the more curious features of the international liberal order is the frequency of solemn declarations to “Never Again” tolerate genocide, given how the vast majority of recent genocides have gone largely ignored. Naturally, many thus assume that this platitude is empty posturing. However, cold apathy towards the lives of ...

CJFP’s Winter 2019 Edition!

Our Winter 2019 edition can be viewed on Issuu at this link and downloaded in the "Journals" tab of our site. Thanks to our staff here at UChicago and our contributors from UChicago and around the country for making this possible.

Nuance vs. Propagandism in the Gate-Maroon Yemen Debate

by DAVIS LARKIN, '19 This past week, the Maroon and the Gate repeatedly clashed on an issue as near and dear to campus affairs as the geopolitics of the Arabian Peninsula. Atman Mehta wrote in the Maroon to criticize a number of articles published in the Gate as uncritically echoing imperialist propaganda about foreign policy ...