Category: Middle East

Refugees and Stateless Persons in the Case of the Syrian Crisis

by JON HOFFMAN, George Mason University '19 Introduction: “Stateless” vs “Refugee” vs “Stateless Refugee” The issues of statelessness and refugees represent serious challenges to the global community, with wide-reaching repercussions that affect both developed and developing nations. More than 12 million people around the world are considered stateless, while approximately 65 million are considered refugees.[1] ...

Nuance vs. Propagandism in the Gate-Maroon Yemen Debate

by DAVIS LARKIN, '19 This past week, the Maroon and the Gate repeatedly clashed on an issue as near and dear to campus affairs as the geopolitics of the Arabian Peninsula. Atman Mehta wrote in the Maroon to criticize a number of articles published in the Gate as uncritically echoing imperialist propaganda about foreign policy ...

What India Can Learn From Turkey’s Economic Crisis

by MOLLY MCCAMMON, '21 Turkey is in the midst of an economic crisis, with the lira down nearly 45 percent from the beginning of the year. [1] High inflation combined with President Erdogan’s stubborn insistence on keeping interest rates low have influenced the current crisis, causing Turks to fret about their ability to buy basic goods ...

Dubious Decapitation: How Mullah Fazlullah’s Death Will Affect the Pakistani Taliban

by BEN SILVIAN, '20 At first glance, the U.S. military’s successful drone strike against Mullah Fazlullah, the head of the Pakistani Taliban (TTP), on June 13 is a major success. Fazlullah, who had lead the militant group since 2013, was known to be a “particularly ruthless militant.”[i] He was responsible for ordering the 2012 attack ...

Untangling a Diplomatic History – An Analysis of American Interventionist Policy in Iran from 1951-1954

by KATIE GARCIA, Columbia University '20 The nationalization of Iranian oil and the subsequent emergence of nationalist leader Mohammad Mossadegh as prime minister signify a watershed moment in the history of diplomatic relations between the United States and Iran.  Domestically, Mossadegh represented constitutionalism, resource autonomy, and popular nationalism.  In the eyes of United States officials, ...

We Don’t Negotiate With Terrorists – But Should We?

by REBECCA MOONEY, University of Rochester '18 Abstract This study analyzes the efficacy of the no-concessions policy used against terrorist groups during hostage crises and related incidents. Specifically, I address whether conceding to a terrorist organization’s ransom demand influences the frequency of future attacks committed by the group. Existing research evaluates the effect of a ...

Russia v. Russia: The Ex-Soviet Fighters in Iraq and Syria

by JOSH ZAKHAROV Last September, Russia claimed to have killed the Islamic State’s Minister of War with a bunker-buster airstrike in Deir ez-Zor, Syria. This kind of leadership decapitation is a common strategy in counterinsurgency – the logic that targeting leaders can disorganize and weaken insurgent groups is sound on face, and is in no ...