All posts by CJFP

The Origins of Corruption in the Philippines: The “Cultural Deviancy” Fallacy

by TOMMIE THOMPSON It has practically become a trope among the elites of the Philippines – the ilustrados – to attribute their nation’s failures to their own idiocy. Often times they call on their peers to reject corruption, vice, and backwardness, and to look to the West (especially the US) for inspiration. Ateneo de Manila University’s ...

Deradicalization in Pakistan

by MOHAMMAD TAIMUR ALI AHMAD The attack on Army Public School (APS) Peshawar and the subsequent chain of events exposed a great deal about Pakistan’s counterterrorism policy. The sheer brutality of the act shook the masses and led them to come out on the streets in protest, while the audacity and success of the terrorists ...

Emerging Trends in the International Relations Arena

by SYED DANISH ALI This article sheds light on emerging risks and trends in the International Relations arena. It is recognized that International Relations is a far more complex and perplexing area that we might give credit to. There is the thought of what might happen, the actual actions, and the image and perceptions of ...

The Draught of Dominion: Power, Reason, and the Liberal Justification of Empire

by JOSEPH LOCASCIO Francis Fukuyama argues that “most ‘liberal’ European societies were illiberal insofar as they believed in the legitimacy of imperialism, that is, the right of one nation to rule over another nation without regard for the wishes of the ruled.”[1]Imperialism, so the argument goes, is fundamentally illiberal. A nation cannot both rule despotically over ...

The Rise of the Athenian Empire: Power, Survival, and the Spartan Contribution

by JOSEPH LOCASCIO Was Sparta responsible for the rise of the Athenian Empire? Not to a great degree. Indeed, Sparta did not even provide a crucial push in the direction of Athenian Empire. It is fair to say, however, that Sparta facilitated the process by which Athens began to play the imperial role. Despite Spartan ...

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A Path Once Traveled: How Southeast Asia Withstood the Global Recession

TOMMIE THOMPSON — Like a lot of the developing world, Southeast Asia was fairly resilient during the initial thrust of the Global Recession. The region had one of the smallest dips in economic performance, and a few of its countries – Indonesia and the Philippines – even experienced growth. However, its success was not sustained ...

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A Fulcrum to the Asian Pivot: Creating Lasting Democratic Societies in South-East Asia

MITCHELL DENNIS — Of the eleven nations comprising South-East Asia, only three can be classified as democracies. The region comprises over 600 million people; yet none of them live in a free society, as measured by Freedom House. Democracies were not always rare in this region. The region was often championed as a paragon for ...