All posts by CJFP

Nuance vs. Propagandism in the Gate-Maroon Yemen Debate

by DAVIS LARKIN, '19 This past week, the Maroon and the Gate repeatedly clashed on an issue as near and dear to campus affairs as the geopolitics of the Arabian Peninsula. Atman Mehta wrote in the Maroon to criticize a number of articles published in the Gate as uncritically echoing imperialist propaganda about foreign policy ...

A Future For China-India-Nepal? Maybe Not.

by MOLLY MCCAMMON, '21 In the last few years, Nepal has generated billions of dollars in investments from its northern neighbor China. Trade between the two countries has grown from 108 million US dollars to 990 million dollars in the past decade alone, making China Nepal’s second-largest trading partner. [1] Furthermore, China has invested heavily ...

What India Can Learn From Turkey’s Economic Crisis

by MOLLY MCCAMMON, '21 Turkey is in the midst of an economic crisis, with the lira down nearly 45 percent from the beginning of the year. [1] High inflation combined with President Erdogan’s stubborn insistence on keeping interest rates low have influenced the current crisis, causing Turks to fret about their ability to buy basic goods ...

Hold Them Back, Run Faster – Beating the Made in China 2025 Strategy

by JAKOB URDA, '19 On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the world’s first orbital satellite. No less astounding was the R-7 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile which carried the small metal ball into space—capable of also delivering thermonuclear warheads to American cities. In launching the space race, Sputnik ushered in the age of the ...

The Wrong Peak, Part 2: Technological Change

by JACK HAYNIE, '20 The oil industry, like any other sector of the economy, is eternally at the mercy of technological change. Increasingly, petroleum has been pressured by changes to industries where it once was the unquestioned energy source of choice. Even where it is still used, innovations in fuel efficiency have drastically reduced the ...

The Wrong Peak: How the Global Economy Silently Turned Against Oil, Part 1

by JACK HAYNIE, '20 For decades, rising oil demand has been taken almost as a given by policymakers and private sector energy producers alike. Rhetoric about “peak oil,” from the 1970s onwards, has become a trope in popular discussions about the energy industry and resource management policy. The logic goes that, as the global middle ...

A Year after Santos’ Nobel Peace Prize, Why is Colombia Not at Peace?

by JOSH ZAKHAROV, '20 In August 2016, Juan Manuel Santos, then President of Colombia, and Timoleon “Timochenko” Jimenez, then leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), shook hands in Havana to seal an agreement that would end a civil conflict that had wreaked hundreds of thousands of casualties, displaced millions, and lasted decades. ...