All posts by CJFP

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Democratic Transition & Authoritarian Exceptionalism

This article uses the case of Egypt, during and after the Arab Spring, to highlight the shortcomings of the popular transition paradigm and challenge theorists who contend that Islam is to blame for the widespread authoritarianism in the region.

CJFP’s Winter 2020 Edition

Our Spring 2019 edition can be viewed on Issuu at this link and downloaded in the “Journals” tab of our site. Thanks to our staff here at UChicago and our contributors from UChicago and around the country for making this possible.

Reactions to Extreme Symbolic Terrorism: the Cases of ISIS and al-Qaeda

by HUGO BARRILLON, '21 All terrorist attacks are not created equal. Some terror attacks bring about global campaigns against terror organizations, while others just bring about localized, national punishment within a judicial system. The 9/11 attacks and the 2014 ISIS beheadings brought about incredibly strong reactions from the victim country whereas events such as the ...

Authoritarianism and Suicide Terrorism

by JORDANNA YOCHAI, '21 All suicide attack data is the intellectual property of the Chicago Project on Security & Threats (CPOST) and was accessed with the permission of Director Robert Pape. Introduction Suicide terrorism is a complex and, unfortunately, global phenomenon, whose incidence has only increased over time. In light of this, both academics and ...

A New Solution to Heal NATO’s Transatlantic Divide

by JAKOB URDA, '19 and ADAM CHAN, '19 NATO is in a crisis moment. Critics from both sides of the Atlantic and all sides of the political debate are doubting NATO’s purpose. The transatlantic relationship is fraying as America and Europe are apparently moving away from each other on policy. Current American demands that European ...

CJFP’s Spring Quarter 2019 Edition

Our Spring 2019 edition can be viewed on Issuu at this link and downloaded in the “Journals” tab of our site. Thanks to our staff here at UChicago and our contributors from UChicago and around the country for making this possible.

Who Decides when Britain Goes to War? The War Prerogative in the United Kingdom

by GWYNETH HOCHHAUSLER, '20 Traditionally, the British Parliament holds far fewer foreign policy powers than the Prime Minister does.[1] One of the most important of these powers, which the executive has controlled for hundreds of years, is the war prerogative – the power “to declare war and deploy the armed forces”.[2]  Some academics have asserted ...